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When ChatGPT made its debut in late 2022, the initial reaction was varied to say the least. Some technology experts predicted a bold new future of automation and innovation, business leaders predicted massive savings due to the elimination of huge swaths of jobs for millions of people while doomsayers predicted the end of the world when AI becomes self-aware.

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AI by 2025:
The urgent need for Training and Skilling

Contributors:

Allyn Bailey

Senior Director, SmartRecruiters

Julian Thomas

Managing Director of Digital Product, AMS

Rebecca Wettemann

CEO & Principal Analyst, Valoir

Generative AI (Gen AI) is an important part of the future of work but what does that mean for talent leaders?

Our experts agree that a new approach to skilling current and future employees in the ethical use of artificial intelligence is a must.

When ChatGPT made its debut in late 2022, the initial reaction was varied to say the least. Some technology experts predicted a bold new future of automation and innovation, business leaders predicted massive savings due to the elimination of huge swaths of jobs for millions of people while doomsayers predicted the end of the world when AI becomes self-aware. Thankfully, the more dire predictions haven’t materialized as organizations have proceeded with caution when it comes to handing the keys over to a tool that some critics have called “spicy autocomplete” in online memes.   

Talent leaders and their human resource counterparts have taken a keen interest in using Generative AI in their operations with plans to expand its use by 2025. And they are taking steps right now to make the promise of Gen AI in the organization a productive and profitable reality. To achieve these goals, TA leaders will need to focus on AI training so that current and future employees have the right skills to use AI as effectively and as ethically as possible.

Unfortunately, most modern talent acquisition teams have not adequately addressed skilling for using AI in the coming year, according to “Is HR Ready for AI,” a new report from market research firm Valoir.

In a study of 150 global HR leaders, Valoir found that nearly one quarter of businesses have adopted some form of Gen AI for talent acquisition, making it the leading area for Gen AI adoption to date. Meanwhile, 30 percent plan to adopt it in the next 24 months. In terms of training employees for using AI, however, only 14 percent have an established training policy, and a shockingly low eight percent have a skills development program in place for workers whose positions could be made extinct by machine learning.

According to Rebecca Wettemann, CEO and principal analyst for the Arlington, Virginia-based Valoir, TA leaders and their HR counterparts need to establish policies that provide guardrails for the safe and effective use of AI for all employees including their recruitment teams.

“Given how rapidly the field is evolving, TA leaders are going to have to look beyond their traditional training strategies to deliver effective AI training that is tailored to individual roles and existing skills levels,” says Wettemann.

And today’s Gen AI tools can help create the training and skilling programs for new and current employees. “Talent leaders need to move to a skills-based approach — if they haven’t already — to identify opportunities for retraining and upskilling as well as skills gaps,” adds Wettemann. “The good news (and irony) is that AI is well suited to helping them build dynamic skills taxonomies and map skills to learning and development opportunities.”

Gen AI Training Needs for Today and Tomorrow

TA leaders and their recruiting teams using machine learning is fairly old news. TA solutions have used AI to scour resumes, cover letters and job applications in recent years, but with the release of ChatGPT and similar tools that use large language models (LLMs), some recruiters are relying on Gen AI tools to craft interview questions and candidate emails, power chatbots that interact with candidates and guide them through the application and interview process, as well as establish that the hiring process complies with DEI mandates and current employment laws.

Along with this innovation, greater use of AI is coming to the hiring process and the training required may never stop, says Allyn Bailey, senior director of customer marketing for TA solution provider SmartRecruiters and a former global recruiter for Intel Corp.

“This technology isn’t just tinkering around the edges; it’s poised to fundamentally overhaul key aspects of the recruitment process,” says Bailey. “From recruitment marketing to candidate communication, assessment, and even the aggregation of hiring manager feedback, the potential for change is enormous.”

That said, Bailey says that machine learning’s most significant impact will come from businesses that don’t just stop at implementing Gen AI solutions. “The real game-changers will be those that strategically integrate these AI capabilities with a wide range of automation solutions, creating a seamless, efficient, and highly effective recruitment ecosystem,” she says.

“This holistic approach is where the future of talent acquisition lies, and we’re on the cusp of that exciting frontier,” adds Bailey.

Julian Thomas, Managing Director of Digital Product for AMS, paraphrases the advice that Uncle Ben gave Peter Parker in the origin story of Spider-Man: With great power comes great responsibility. And this means training employees with a new set of AI skills for the future.

“The training must focus on judgment and knowing the limitations of the technology. The people that are going to win are those who understand the limitations of this new technology as well as the opportunities,” he says. “The market is moving very fast and the technology’s moving even faster, so we need good training.”

One key area for training is data. SmartRecruiters’s Bailey predicts that TA professionals who use Gen AI will have to become data experts or become more comfortable with gathering and analyzing reams of information.

“In the Gen AI-driven hiring landscape, recruiters need to become maestros of tech, data, ethics, and experience design,” she says. “It’s about getting smart with automation tools to streamline TA operations, diving deep into data analytics for sharper insights, and navigating the ethical maze of AI with a clear compass.”

This new data generated by AI can be analyzed for greater insights into the organization and the people who use these tools. “While we have reports on time to hire and things like that, AI is applying a large language model to the structured data we generate. This will make a much more natural way of reading insight from our process and the data we generate,” says Thomas.

One of those insights is the candidate experience in the recruitment process, or what Bailey calls the “secret sauce” in creating “journeys” through the hiring process that resonate with candidates and TA teams alike to make every touchpoint meaningful with AI.

“Savvy recruiters will weave these elements together, creating a recruitment symphony that’s both efficient and human-centric,” she says. “As companies catch the beat, those leading the charge in blending these skills will not just fill positions but will shape the future of work itself. It’s time to remix recruitment with a blend of tech, heart, and art.”

Avoiding AI Hallucinations and Other Traps

But not all is wine and roses when using current ChatGPT and similar tools. Ask anyone who has used ChatGPT to write their obituary; the results are often ludicrous. The current batch of machine-learning tools have a propensity to generate responses that are flat-out false when given low-quality data;  improper or misleading prompts; or unique interpretations of different AI systems. These are called “AI Hallucinations” when a Gen AI tool fabricates answers from whole cloth.

And there are real-world repercussions when AI Hallucinations occur. ChatGPT, for example, inferred that an Australian politician was guilty in a bribery scandal when he was in fact the whistleblower. In the summer of 2023, a U.S. judge fined two New York lawyers who submitted a legal brief that included six fabricated case citations generated by the same Gen AI platform. This illicit action came at a price: a fine of $5,000.

“TA leaders need to be thinking about training beyond the technical use of AI in areas like critical thinking, so employees will be prepared to evaluate and interpret recommendations that AI delivers,” advises Wettemann.

Thomas agrees. “TA teams also need measurement of the effectiveness and outcomes of their work. We need to establish controls to understand the efficacy and ensure everyone is using it in the same way,” he says. “The organizations that do that will be successful.”

Right now, challenges have emerged in adopting policies and practices for AI training. Valoir found that the biggest hurdle inside organizations is a lack of AI skills and expertise (26 percent), followed by the fear of risk or compliance issues (23 percent), and lack of resources or budget (22 percent).

Training for Using AI Ethically

Employees using AI must also be trained in its ethical use, especially in terms of achieving DEI mandates and complying with government regulations. The current iteration of Gen AI may be a modern, cutting-edge tool that is less than two years old, employers cannot ignore anti-discrimination employment laws that have been on the book for decades. But the potential is there, warns AMS’ Thomas. These large language models (LLMs) based on public Internet content and data gathered inside an organization has the potential to, in his words, “institutionalize corporate biases.” In short, recruiters using AI may inadvertently end up interviewing and recruiting people who look like them and share their backgrounds.

At the same time, recruiters must train for the day when recruiters will allow Gen AI to make hiring decisions, even if this reality could be years in the future.

AI will indeed take the reins in hiring decisions, predicts Bailey. “While we’re often hesitant to sideline human judgment, the reality is that humans bring biases, delays, and inconsistencies to the table,” she says. “AI, on the other hand, offers a path to more objective, efficient, and streamlined recruitment processes.”

Despite what Bailey calls “popular resistance” to the idea that a machine will eventually hire human beings, she believes that the future of hiring leans heavily towards AI-driven decisions. “The question isn’t if AI will lead in hiring, but when and how we’ll adapt to this shift,” she says.

Thomas agrees that it would be naive for TA leaders to assume that Gen AI hiring new workers won’t happen in the near future in the same way that medical AI tools won’t diagnose illnesses and prescribe medications. Not only will AI hire new workers, Thomas believes it will decide which AI technology to deploy inside an enterprise.

“Will AI recruit people? If it does, it’ll be because it’s trusted, understood and measured to be more effective than a human recruiter. But while it isn’t measured and known to be more effective right now, then it shouldn’t do so,” he says.

“This is one reason that recruiters should be trained and not currently hand over the hiring of a candidate to Generative AI, no matter how smart it appears to be,” advises Thomas.

Ultimately, employees and especially TA teams must be trained in the potential power of Gen AI as a productive and potentially disruptive form of workplace technology. At the same time, everyone who trains employees in using this new gear must not lose sight of the people it is designed to serve.

“This is really about putting human factors first and understanding that while there’s plenty of potential benefit from AI, there’s also a lot of fear and it’s not all unfounded,” warns Wettemann. “Rather than taking a technology-first generative AI strategy, leaders will need to take a human-first approach, giving employees both the guardrails and incentives they need to maximize value and minimize risk from AI.”

 written by Phil Albinus and reviewed by Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Training for Using AI Ethically

Employees using AI must also be trained in its ethical use, especially in terms of achieving DEI mandates and complying with government regulations. The current iteration of Gen AI may be a modern, cutting-edge tool that is less than two years old, employers cannot ignore anti-discrimination employment laws that have been on the book for decades. But the potential is there, warns AMS’ Thomas. These large language models (LLMs) based on public Internet content and data gathered inside an organization has the potential to, in his words, “institutionalize corporate biases.” In short, recruiters using AI may inadvertently end up interviewing and recruiting people who look like them and share their backgrounds.

At the same time, recruiters must train for the day when recruiters will allow Gen AI to make hiring decisions, even if this reality could be years in the future.

AI will indeed take the reins in hiring decisions, predicts Bailey. “While we’re often hesitant to sideline human judgment, the reality is that humans bring biases, delays, and inconsistencies to the table,” she says. “AI, on the other hand, offers a path to more objective, efficient, and streamlined recruitment processes.”

Despite what Bailey calls “popular resistance” to the idea that a machine will eventually hire human beings, she believes that the future of hiring leans heavily towards AI-driven decisions. “The question isn’t if AI will lead in hiring, but when and how we’ll adapt to this shift,” she says.

Thomas agrees that it would be naive for TA leaders to assume that Gen AI hiring new workers won’t happen in the near future in the same way that medical AI tools won’t diagnose illnesses and prescribe medications. Not only will AI hire new workers, Thomas believes it will decide which AI technology to deploy inside an enterprise.

“Will AI recruit people? If it does, it’ll be because it’s trusted, understood and measured to be more effective than a human recruiter. But while it isn’t measured and known to be more effective right now, then it shouldn’t do so,” he says.

“This is one reason that recruiters should be trained and not currently hand over the hiring of a candidate to Generative AI, no matter how smart it appears to be,” advises Thomas.

Ultimately, employees and especially TA teams must be trained in the potential power of Gen AI as a productive and potentially disruptive form of workplace technology. At the same time, everyone who trains employees in using this new gear must not lose sight of the people it is designed to serve.

“This is really about putting human factors first and understanding that while there’s plenty of potential benefit from AI, there’s also a lot of fear and it’s not all unfounded,” warns Wettemann. “Rather than taking a technology-first generative AI strategy, leaders will need to take a human-first approach, giving employees both the guardrails and incentives they need to maximize value and minimize risk from AI.”

 written by Phil Albinus and reviewed by Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Allyn Bailey

Senior Director, SmartRecruiters

Julian Thomas

Managing Director of Digital Product, AMS

Rebecca Wettemann

CEO & Principal Analyst, Valoir


Building talent is often more effective than recruiting, and is now considered essential for enterprise success, candidate attraction and employee retention. Here’s what forward-looking TA and HR leaders must remember to retain talent and drive productivity.

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The Art of Skills-Based Hiring:

How to increase productivity and growth while averting the current skills crisis

Contributors:

April Hicks

Head of Global Talent Acquisition, People Strategy & Enablement, Bank of America

Tim Gillespie

Interim Head of The Academy, Bank of America

Josh Bersin

Founder, Josh Bersin Company

Lisa Forrest

Managing Director, Client Services, Americas, AMS

Bernard Marr

Futurist, strategic advisor and business author

Building talent is often more effective than recruiting, and is now considered essential for enterprise success, candidate attraction and employee retention.

Here’s what forward-looking TA and HR leaders must remember to retain talent and drive productivity.

Do you hear that sound? Throughout nearly every business, human resource and talent acquisition leaders can hear the quiet rumble of a crisis resulting in the lack of skilled employees and recruits. It’s getting louder and most C-suite executives are only just beginning to respond to these ominous signs.

Look at some headlines:

  • Recently, Slack, the workplace chat platform owned by Salesforce, placed its employees on a one-week hiatus to earn “Ranger Status” via its Trailhead online learning platform
  • A recent Enterprise Strategy Report found that 71% cybersecurity executives admit that they’ve been impacted by the cybersecurity skills shortage, which has increased workload for cybersecurity teams (61%), left job openings unfilled (49%), and caused high burnout among staff (43%) 
  • Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company postponed the opening of its Arizona chip factory to 2025 due to a shortage of technical workers

We are in the midst of a critical skills crisis. According to news reports, HR and TA experts believe that by 2030, demand for skilled professionals will far outstrip supply, and will result in a financial impact of $8.452 trillion in unrealized revenue. This crisis has spread to many fields that were once seen as desirable and lucrative by candidates and were once easy to find capable workers: IT, cybersecurity, finance and environmental science among others. But there is hope, say TA and HR leaders. The good news is that there are solutions to this crisis if companies address this challenge head on by evaluating how and where they find talented people. In short, they must invest in their future with the skills they need to be producers and leaders inside their companies. 

This is where reskilling, upskilling and new skills can become the differentiator between failure and success. 

According to HR technology analyst Josh Bersin, one answer to the ever-expanding skills crisis is to lean in “fast and hard” to reskilling the existing workforce. But this is easier said than done, he adds.

“Reskilling is an intentional shift in how your company thinks about employee learning and development as well as retention, and it requires coordination at all levels of your organization,” says the founder of HR technology market research firm The Josh Bersin Company. “But if you get it right, you will reap the benefits from increased productivity—aka profitability—as well as developing higher rates of employee retention and a deeper commitment towards your brand.”

TA leaders have heard this message loud and clear and are responding to the changing nature of employee and candidate skills. Not long ago, a candidate’s resume lead with their job experience and education on top of the paper or electronic resume with a small list of skills at the bottom of the document.

“Now, skills have switched places in importance and priority with education and experience thanks to the increased demands of modern work,” says Lisa Forrest, Managing Director of Client Services for AMS. 

“The skills that I had at the bottom of my CV were relevant when I started my job and were probably relevant 10 years into my job, but those skills might no longer be relevant two years from now,” she says. 

The increased and insatiable demand for new skills has spurred employers to hire candidates for the skills that they currently possess, but HR and TA leaders must also be aware of the skills they will need for the same role in the years to come. If that were not challenging enough, employers must screen for candidate’s willingness to learn new skills as well.

“It’s not just the skills that the candidate has today. It’s their ability that I see in them to acquire additional skills as they work,” says Forrest. “I may not care if they worked on a legal, sales or an operations team I want to know if they can learn new ones along the way.”

Unfortunately, Forrest says this is where leaders get “stuck.” Hiring managers may know the hard skills that a role requires—knowledge and experience with risk and compliance in financial services, for example—but they may not know the soft skills that are also necessary for filling a new role.

“When you ask a company to work out what skills they need, they typically are asking for soft skills. They might be negotiation skills, a level of moral conduct and code of behavior. It could be the need for people to pay a high attention to detail or adherence to a framework of rules,” says Forrest. “Hiring managers and recruiters often find it difficult to pinpoint what they’re asking for.”

Fortunately, there is no shortage of TA solution providers—many of which are AMS partners— whose tools can assess and infer current and emerging skills. According to Bersin, vendors like Eightfold, Gloat, Phenom, Beamery, and others use advanced AI to identify candidate skills from their job experiences and other relationships. 

“The big challenges companies have is deciding what skills to associate with a given job, and then building a taxonomy. Most companies have over-engineered themselves to death and unfortunately, some tools are not really that useful yet,” says Bersin. “SAP is actually there but in general most companies are relying upon a new generation of talent intelligence tools to do this.”

When asked to name the hot skills for the future, Forrest calls this “the golden question.” Ironically, the quest for many of these hot skills in the coming two to four years are not entirely brand new. Just ask Bernard Marr. The futurist, strategic advisor and business author believes that the hot skills for 2024 will be found in Generative AI and machine learning, sustainability, project management and communications, healthcare, data, interpersonal networking, cloud computing, and cybersecurity. Although these topics have been around for years—the concepts of cloud computing have been around since the 1960s—the skills required to master these constantly developing fields continue to grow at a rapid pace.

This is why employers must focus on skills and reskilling candidates and current employees like never before.

Enter “The Academy” at Bank of America

One employer that did just that is Bank of America. One of the world’s largest financial institutions, it offers skilling and reskilling to its 213,000 global employees via The Academy of Bank of America.

According to Tim Gillespie, interim head of The Academy, the bank’s in-house education initiative began in 2016 with a focus on its consumer business and financial centers and expanded to wealth management in 2019. In 2021, Bank of America merged its global learning organizations and officially launched The Academy at Bank of America to support the career development of all employees.

Gillespie says that The Academy is a “shining example of true partnership” across Bank of America’s different functions including lines of business, global human resources and other divisions. “We knew that there was variability in the employee experience happening across the board, both in onboarding and upskilling, and making sure that people understood what’s expected of them in that role,” he says.

Once it started its skilling initiative, Bank of America soon realized that it had to gather disparate groups inside the bank to deliver consistency for new employees. “We know that if new recruits can be onboarded and feel like they’re cared for, set up for success, understand the values and expectations of our company, that we are far more likely to improve retention, and therefore reduce attrition,” Gillespie says. He adds that the bank wanted to increase the speed to proficiency and productivity, which ultimately helps to serve the client better.

The Academy also supports industry licenses and designations such as the Series 7 – aka the General Securities Representative Exam—and Certified Financial Planner degree. “We provide them with a calendar, the resources, and in many cases, instructor-led training to allow them to do that while they continue in their role at Bank of America,” he says.

The Academy also leverages immersive technology for learning – including deploying virtual reality (VR) headsets at 4,000 financial centers to better equip employees for challenging conversations, train for banking and advising procedures, and even how to respond to dangerous situations like a bank robbery. Last year, The Academy conducted more than 940,000 practice sessions in its immersive technology modalities, and teammates shared that the exercises helped them deliver better service to bank clients and customers.

Along with building up The Academy with cutting-edge technology, the bank is in its third year of creating a job architecture, which includes a robust skills library to help the bank create a job framework that groups similar jobs inside the organization. 

“This ensures that people have a clear understanding of what we call ‘job families’ to help anyone who wants to move across the company,” says April Hicks, Head of Global Talent Acquisition, People Strategy & Enablement at Bank of America. Prior to the creation of this job architecture, Hicks says the bank didn’t have a consistent language or framework to entice people to pursue new skills. “It became challenging for people to assess a skill when we’re not talking about that skill in the same way,” she recalls. 

In response, Bank of America created a skills library that boasts more than 200 skills and is in the process of embedding those skills into its HR processes with plans to link them to its employee learning solutions. 

“We’ve used it to create job descriptions that are standardized and make it easy for employees to look at it and say, ‘now I get it,’ ” she says. 

While The Academy and the skills taxonomy are powered by a variety of HR and TA technology solutions, they all operate with Bank of America’s core HR solution, Workday. The bank also built a custom jobs portal that houses every job description, related information, and how it connects with the Bank of America workforce. “All of that information flows between Workday and the other solutions to ensure that that information can be fed into our hiring processes,” says Hicks.

The good news, the reskilling program inside Bank of America has had a positive impact on employee retention even as other global companies struggle to address the skills crisis. Bank of America’s internal talent communities have helped drive employee retention as employees have the ability to learn about new roles and opportunities inside the bank and obtain the skills needed for those positions. In 2022, Hicks says that 30,000 Bank of America employees moved to new roles within the organization. 

“We want individuals to work for us for a career, not a job. We absolutely believe in making it easy for our employees to move throughout the company,” says Hicks. 

“We’re a big company and frankly, there’s no reason to go down the street,” she says. “Why not stay with us and let us help you find that opportunity inside Bank of America?”

 written by Phil Albinus and reviewed by Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Enter “The Academy” at Bank of America

One employer that did just that is Bank of America. One of the world’s largest financial institutions, it offers skilling and reskilling to its 213,000 global employees via The Academy of Bank of America.

According to Tim Gillespie, interim head of The Academy, the bank’s in-house education initiative began in 2016 with a focus on its consumer business and financial centers and expanded to wealth management in 2019. In 2021, Bank of America merged its global learning organizations and officially launched The Academy at Bank of America to support the career development of all employees.

Gillespie says that The Academy is a “shining example of true partnership” across Bank of America’s different functions including lines of business, global human resources and other divisions. “We knew that there was variability in the employee experience happening across the board, both in onboarding and upskilling, and making sure that people understood what’s expected of them in that role,” he says.

Once it started its skilling initiative, Bank of America soon realized that it had to gather disparate groups inside the bank to deliver consistency for new employees. “We know that if new recruits can be onboarded and feel like they’re cared for, set up for success, understand the values and expectations of our company, that we are far more likely to improve retention, and therefore reduce attrition,” Gillespie says. He adds that the bank wanted to increase the speed to proficiency and productivity, which ultimately helps to serve the client better.

The Academy also supports industry licenses and designations such as the Series 7 – aka the General Securities Representative Exam—and Certified Financial Planner degree. “We provide them with a calendar, the resources, and in many cases, instructor-led training to allow them to do that while they continue in their role at Bank of America,” he says.

The Academy also leverages immersive technology for learning – including deploying virtual reality (VR) headsets at 4,000 financial centers to better equip employees for challenging conversations, train for banking and advising procedures, and even how to respond to dangerous situations like a bank robbery. Last year, The Academy conducted more than 940,000 practice sessions in its immersive technology modalities, and teammates shared that the exercises helped them deliver better service to bank clients and customers.

Along with building up The Academy with cutting-edge technology, the bank is in its third year of creating a job architecture, which includes a robust skills library to help the bank create a job framework that groups similar jobs inside the organization. 

“This ensures that people have a clear understanding of what we call ‘job families’ to help anyone who wants to move across the company,” says April Hicks, Head of Global Talent Acquisition, People Strategy & Enablement at Bank of America. Prior to the creation of this job architecture, Hicks says the bank didn’t have a consistent language or framework to entice people to pursue new skills. “It became challenging for people to assess a skill when we’re not talking about that skill in the same way,” she recalls. 

In response, Bank of America created a skills library that boasts more than 200 skills and is in the process of embedding those skills into its HR processes with plans to link them to its employee learning solutions. 

“We’ve used it to create job descriptions that are standardized and make it easy for employees to look at it and say, ‘now I get it,’ ” she says. 

While The Academy and the skills taxonomy are powered by a variety of HR and TA technology solutions, they all operate with Bank of America’s core HR solution, Workday. The bank also built a custom jobs portal that houses every job description, related information, and how it connects with the Bank of America workforce. “All of that information flows between Workday and the other solutions to ensure that that information can be fed into our hiring processes,” says Hicks.

The good news, the reskilling program inside Bank of America has had a positive impact on employee retention even as other global companies struggle to address the skills crisis. Bank of America’s internal talent communities have helped drive employee retention as employees have the ability to learn about new roles and opportunities inside the bank and obtain the skills needed for those positions. In 2022, Hicks says that 30,000 Bank of America employees moved to new roles within the organization. 

“We want individuals to work for us for a career, not a job. We absolutely believe in making it easy for our employees to move throughout the company,” says Hicks. 

“We’re a big company and frankly, there’s no reason to go down the street,” she says. “Why not stay with us and let us help you find that opportunity inside Bank of America?”

 written by Phil Albinus and reviewed by Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

April Hicks

Head of Global Talent Acquisition, People Strategy & Enablement, Bank of America

Tim Gillespie

Interim Head of The Academy, Bank of America

Josh Bersin

Founder, Josh Bersin Company

Lisa Forrest

Managing Director, Client Services, Americas, AMS

Bernard Marr

Futurist, strategic advisor and business author


Contributors:

View the story

Think your business is too small for RPO?
Think again.

Contributors:

Josh Bersin

Founder and CEO of The Josh Bersin Company and HR and TA technology analyst

Kimberly Kelly

EVP, Managing Director Client Services Americas, AMS

Rebecca Wettemann

Founder and CEO of market analysis firm, Valoir

Understanding when to delegate tasks and let go is a challenge for all business leaders, but it is especially difficult for those running startups and small to medium size enterprises.

When is the right time to hand over the reins to an expert and focus on something different? How do you know when you need help? Most importantly, when will the benefits of outsourcing outweigh the costs?

The US is home to more than 33 million small businesses employing approximately half of its entire workforce. Millions of new small firms are created each year, boosting the economy and building new jobs. Yet finding, attracting and onboarding quality talent can be a problem for small businesses.

There is a misconception in talent acquisition that recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) is only for big businesses with big turnovers. However, RPO can be hugely effective for SMEs and mid-size companies who are growing rapidly in scale and geographic reach.

Expertise and access

This is because RPO isn’t just about delivering quality recruits at a reduced cost. It’s also about tapping into expertise, talent pools and capacity that you might not otherwise have access to.

“In SMEs there is a feeling that what makes you great is that you do everything. They are concerned that when they leverage a company like AMS they will lose control of what makes their business theirs,” says Kimberly Kelly, EVP, managing director client services Americas at AMS.

“In reality, when we partner with SMEs we are an extension of their organization. We aren’t AMS, we are them,” she adds.

Kelly gives three ways that a RPO provider can help small and midsize companies develop talent acquisition.

“Right now, hiring is on the side of corporations, not talent. There is a deluge of people coming in, but they aren’t always the right people with the right skills.

“Hiring managers are misusing their time as they can’t get through all the candidates applying for roles. The knock-on effect of this is that the candidate experience is really bad as hiring managers are spread too thin. Candidates don’t get responses and this erodes the company’s brand,” says Kelly.

As the talent market fluctuates and becomes a candidate market again, these brands become less desirable as candidates recall previous poor experiences and share them with other potential recruits. Working with a RPO provider allows SMEs to consistently offer candidates a good experience while also identifying the right talent to pursue.

Your voice and brand

Secondly, outsourcing recruitment to an RPO provider gives SMEs better agility and creativity in the talent market.

“We’re often able to help clients by taking on a portion of their business so that they can focus on other areas,” says Kelly.

“They can choose to invest in training their people to get better in certain areas, whether sourcing, skills development or identifying more diverse candidates, or simply focus on what they are best at from a talent acquisition perspective,” she adds.

Finally, recruitment process outsourcing allows businesses to access expertise, knowledge and experience in a way they wouldn’t be able to do so in-house – while retaining control of their business.

“Dependent on size, some small to mid-sized businesses might not even have a ‘true’ recruitment function. Their talent teams might do benefits, employee relations and recruitment all as part of the same job, pulling people in different directions and taking them away from what they are good at,” says Kelly.

“When SMEs work with us, they control the process. They can choose to purchase the piece where they need expertise, whether that’s people who understand how to use recruitment technology, know where to find people or develop procedures – and they do it efficiently in the client’s mechanisms.”

According to HR and TA technology analyst Josh Bersin, recruiting has grown more challenging thanks to a labor shortage and the high demand for skilled candidates.  Not only are highly-skilled roles in great demand, but recruiting technologies, tools, and systems are radically changing, according to the founder and CEO of The Josh Bersin Company.

“By working with a deeply experienced RPO firm, regardless of size, companies can quickly upgrade their process and technology, and take advantage of deep expertise in this complex area”, he tells AMS Catalyst.  “I see RPO as a steady and increasingly important part of the HR marketplace, growing in importance over time.”

Your voice and brand

Secondly, outsourcing recruitment to an RPO provider gives SMEs better agility and creativity in the talent market.

“We’re often able to help clients by taking on a portion of their business so that they can focus on other areas,” says Kelly.

“They can choose to invest in training their people to get better in certain areas, whether sourcing, skills development or identifying more diverse candidates, or simply focus on what they are best at from a talent acquisition perspective,” she adds.

Finally, recruitment process outsourcing allows businesses to access expertise, knowledge and experience in a way they wouldn’t be able to do so in-house – while retaining control of their business.

“Dependent on size, some small to mid-sized businesses might not even have a ‘true’ recruitment function. Their talent teams might do benefits, employee relations and recruitment all as part of the same job, pulling people in different directions and taking them away from what they are good at,” says Kelly.

“When SMEs work with us, they control the process. They can choose to purchase the piece where they need expertise, whether that’s people who understand how to use recruitment technology, know where to find people or develop procedures – and they do it efficiently in the client’s mechanisms.”

According to HR and TA technology analyst Josh Bersin, recruiting has grown more challenging thanks to a labor shortage and the high demand for skilled candidates.  Not only are highly-skilled roles in great demand, but recruiting technologies, tools, and systems are radically changing, according to the founder and CEO of The Josh Bersin Company.

“By working with a deeply experienced RPO firm, regardless of size, companies can quickly upgrade their process and technology, and take advantage of deep expertise in this complex area”, he tells AMS Catalyst.  “I see RPO as a steady and increasingly important part of the HR marketplace, growing in importance over time.”

Project RPO

Recruitment is a labor intensive process that takes time and effort, often with specialist knowledge. Very few mid-sized businesses have the finances and desire to employ a single recruitment specialist, let alone an entire team. Partnering with a RPO provider gives expanding organizations access to expertise at a fraction of the cost. Effectively, SMEs can get recruitment expertise on a pay-per-use model.

This can be particularly useful to businesses that are expanding rapidly into new geographies and sectors. Buying region-specific recruitment knowledge around hiring laws and talent expectations can be invaluable in moving quickly and effectively.

This leads to another misconception around RPO. Many talent professionals believe that RPO is only effective for long-term, complex recruitment challenges. In reality, RPO can be hugely helpful in managing capacity gaps and talent acquisition capability on a project by project basis and Rebecca Wettemann, founder and CEO of market analysis firm Valoir, supports this view. 

“For HR and talent acquisition teams with limited bandwidth, which is almost everyone, RPO is more than just an augmentation of existing resources. RPO can enable HR and talent leaders to scale up and down their recruitment efforts as needed while maintaining access to a broader and diverse field of talent.”

Wettemann went on to explain that “because RPO’s are focused specifically on the talent acquisition process, they can bring up to date knowledge to talent pools and the most effective means to reach them. This is particularly important in areas of new demand or high specialization, or hard-to-find candidates. And of course, RPO’s provide strategic advice and develop recruiting strategies based on in-depth and up-to-date knowledge of evolving regulations and different compliance requirements for different locations, industries, and job roles. Critically, RPO’s are able to leverage their investments and knowledge in people analytics and other cutting-edge technologies to deliver their benefits to their clients without clients having to tackle investments.”

So why should smaller companies consider partnering with a recruitment process outsourcing company to deal with their talent acquisition needs?

By providing access to expert, experienced recruiters, RPO providers can improve your recruitment processes and outcomes, allowing you to focus more on the day-to-day requirements of your business. It can save you money in the long-term on recruitment, while also bringing you better and more diverse candidates. It can also help you develop better internal processes and procedures, all while maintaining your voice and branding.

“If you embrace walking shoulder to shoulder with an RPO provider on the journey of talent attraction, it can only make your talent acquisition team stronger,” smiles Kelly.

written by the Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Josh Bersin

Founder and CEO, The Josh Bersin Company and HR and TA technology analyst

Kimberly Kelly

EVP, Managing Director Client Services Americas, AMS

Rebecca Wettemann

Founder and CEO of market analysis firm, Valoir


The emergence of AI has the potential to radically transform talent acquisition and retention. From enhanced efficiency and improved candidate matching to smoother application journeys and predictive culture fits, up to 80% of American workplaces are already using AI.

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Artificial intelligence, ethics and the world of talent

Contributors:

Kira Makagon

Chief Innovation Officer, RingCentral

Annie Hammer

Head of technology and analytics advisory Americas, AMS

The emergence of AI has the potential to radically transform talent acquisition and retention. From enhanced efficiency and improved candidate matching to smoother application journeys and predictive culture fits, up to 80% of American workplaces are already using AI in some form for employment decision making, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

However, the implementation of any new technology comes with potential downsides. The use of AI in talent acquisition poses several ethical challenges, particularly around issues of bias and discrimination. While AI aims to minimize biases, it can actually amplify existing ones if not calibrated and monitored correctly.

For example, AI systems that evaluate candidates’ facial expressions have been shown to prioritize male, white and able-bodied individuals, according to research by MIT and Stanford University. Startlingly, the study found that the facial recognition systems tested incorrectly assigned gender in more than a third (34.7%) of images of dark-skinned women.

Regulation is coming

Perhaps with such issues in mind, New York City became the first state to implement an AI hiring law, with its Automated Employment Decision Tool law coming into force in July 2023. The legislation forces employers to tell candidates when they are using AI in the hiring process as well as submit to annual audits examining the technology to ensure their systems are not discriminatory. Companies violating the rules face fines.

With further AI regulation in the pipeline, how can organizations create ethical, responsible AI systems that both future proof their workforces and stay on the right side of regulation?

“A lot of organizations that have been excited by AI are now having to grapple with regulation and understand how it affects their systems,” says Annie Hammer, head of technology and analytics advisory Americas at AMS.

“The big thing to understand is whether the technology you are using is actually AI in the first place. If it is, you need to consider the use case. Is it being used for automated decision-making or not? That’s the key issue,” she adds.

New York City’s law has been met with criticism from all sides. Some argue that it is hard to enforce and potentially excludes many uses of automated systems in hiring, while businesses argue that it is an unnecessary burden on the recruitment process.

Such is the uncertainty of its impact that many businesses are ‘waiting and watching’ on its impact before committing to further AI tools, says Hammer.

Meeting ethical challenges

At the heart of this is the need for businesses to stay up to date with technological advances and the impact artificial intelligence is having on their processes. Without adequate training, monitoring and process validation, companies open themselves up to both regulatory issues and to poor adoption of technology.

“We often see organizations that have implemented technology with AI capabilities over a year ago, but haven’t done any refresher training or updates. Not only do they have risk associated with this lack of training, but they also see falling adoption of the technology as they don’t adapt and develop their capabilities. There simply isn’t a maturity around training and governance with AI technology,” says Hammer.

Combating potential challenges around bias and discrimination requires a robust strategy examining the outcomes of technology usage. This might mean running parallel processes, with one group using AI technology and another not, to evaluate outcomes and how the tool is impacting decision-making.

It could also mean creating specific teams responsible for ethical regulation of AI usage in talent tools.

“We’re increasingly seeing new teams being set up to be responsible for hiring technology and their ethical use in business – groups like talent acquisition enablement, talent acquisition operations, talent acquisition innovation and solutions. Essentially, they are teams of business partners working across talent acquisition, legal and compliance, HR and IT to enable new ways of working in the recruitment function,” says Hammer.

The crux of the matter is that decision-making in talent acquisition must ultimately be made by a human. AI can aid the process and make the candidate journey easier, but it cannot be allowed to make the final decision. Organizations need to check that the recommendations technology is making are being challenged by their people, not just waved through.

People-first approach

This applies to other AI use cases at work. Kira Makagon is chief innovation officer at cloud communications platform RingCentral. She believes that businesses need to take a ‘people-first’ approach to the transformative potential of AI.

“In this digital age of communications and enhanced collaboration, artificial intelligence (AI) promises to be the driving force for most, if not all, of the transformation when it comes to ways of working. That promise, however, still depends on the millions of workers who will have an everyday experience with this new technology and therefore, workers must have a say in how it’s implemented and used,” says Makagon.

“Business leaders need to strike the right balance in a people-first approach to AI, as this is crucial to ensuring that the most efficient and functional foundations are laid for the smoothest adoption of AI. Humans make AI better and without their input, businesses will miss out on valuable insight that could determine how successful they are in the future,” she adds.

Hammer agrees that businesses need to look at the impact technology has on their people in a more concerted way. One way of doing this is to utilize AI to engage and develop existing employees.

“We focus a lot of content on external attraction, but AI can be better used to help existing employees find mobility opportunities and new roles. Another growing area is using AI to help guide employees on what skills they need to develop and what jobs they should take.

“A recent study on employee coaching found that some people actually trust AI more than their line managers when it comes to planning their next move,” adds Hammer.

AI regulation is set to grow globally and businesses need to constantly be aware of how changes affect their organization. Effective planning, people-led decision making and skills development are key to meeting this challenge.

Navigating Talent Technology at AMS

If you wish to stay ahead of the curve and be AI-ready be sure to keep regularly informed by visiting the new AMS Navigating Talent Technology resource where you will find up to date and relevant thought leadership focusing on the central role that AI and technology plays within the world of talent.  Explore whitepapers and thought leadership articles and our recently launched Talent Technology Translator helping  you to talk tech fluently and make informed talent decisions, faster. 

written by the Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Kira Makagon

Chief Innovation Officer, RingCentral

Annie Hammer

Head of technology and analytics advisory Americas, AMS





Freelancers and contingent workers form an increasingly important part of an organization’s workforce. According to Staffing Industry Analysts, there were 51.5 million contingent workers in the US in 2021, representing more than a third of the region’s workforce and generating $1.3tn in revenue.

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Integrating contingent labor into strategic talent planning

Contributors:

Dustin Talley
Founder & CEO, Talent Simplified

Mark Jones
Executive Vice President, AMS

Laurie Padua
Managing Director, Talent Advisory Services, AMS

Freelancers and contingent workers form an increasingly important part of an organization’s workforce. According to Staffing Industry Analysts (SIA), there were 51.5 million contingent workers in the US in 2021, representing more than a third (35%) of the region’s workforce and generating $1.3tn in revenue.

This number is almost certain to grow. Companies have weathered an unprecedented level of chaos over recent years, from the impact of the Great Resignation and skills gaps to rising interest rates and heightened production and supply chain costs. At the same time, demand for talent remains high, with 1.9 jobs available for every unemployed person in the US in January, according to data from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics.

The consequence of this state of flux is that companies are increasingly attracted to the flexibility provided by contingent workers. The ability to access experienced, readily available talent at the right variable cost offers employers the agility to meet current talent requirements without the cost of full-time employees. It is also the perfect marriage with more and more workers wanting flexibility in the post pandemic age.

“After the 2008 financial crisis, we saw heavy utilization of contract workers. At that time, it was driven by necessity, but not strategic in most cases. This time around is proving to be different. The organizations that get it right will find ways to use budget wisely in place of headcount. Instead of just filling roles reactively, companies are taking proactive measures like building talent pools and equipping their teams with access to on-demand resources,” says Dustin Talley, CEO and founder of Talent Simplified.

However, if done without proper thought, the growth in contingent hiring also brings challenges for organizations – not least in terms of reputational risk and potential damage to existing employees’ engagement.

Skills not silos

One of the main challenges with contingent hiring is that it is often run in a silo, separate from other talent functions. In the US, contingent hiring is often the remit of the procurement department with permanent recruitment run by human resources. The reality is that these two functions often operate individually and with little interaction, making the integration of contingent hiring into strategic workforce planning difficult.

“The operational reality shows that the idea of total talent management is still theoretical,” says Mark Jones, Executive Vice President at AMS.

“One of the challenges of contingent labor is that it is by default a tactical solution to find people quickly. When you do that, you use a staffing agency. It is ingrained in how supply chains including internally and externally run MSP’s operate. So, this whole concept of brand and loyalty is nice in theory but will only work if talent acquisition leaders genuinely change how resources are procured.” He goes on to add: “It requires an extra layer of thought, joined up planning and thinking which until recently, often is simply put into the nice to have, but not now category.”

Progress may be slow, but the move towards a more innovative approach to contingent hiring is undeniable. The growth in skills-based approaches to hiring – which puts an individual’s skills profile above employment method, experience and location – is furthering this trend.

“A lot of this is about undoing an existing mindset of needing to hire someone versus needing to get something done. As we enter the skills-based economy, work is about getting a project done rather than completing a 40-hour working week,” says Talley.

According to a SIA report released in May, while only 28% of organizations currently have a strategy for contingent workforce planning as part of their corporate strategy, more than half (55%) are exploring it. The same study indicated that 27% of organizations have a talent pool of some description in place to source contingent workers but 46% were considering it.

“Skills-based companies will win in the future. It will be slow, but it will play out. I see mid-sized companies gaining market share as they’re being smarter around talent and tagging the skills so they know what they have. They are the ones competing and winning, as they’re quick to respond to both clients’ needs and their own internal talent requirements,” adds Talley.

“We’re in the first innings of a nine innings game and skills-based hiring is a part of that,” agrees Jones.

“However, the best time to outsource is in an environment like today, where organizations are coming off all-time highs in hiring. There is a reduction in open roles and all our clients are hiring less, which means there is more capacity in the contingent market,” he adds.

Part of the challenge in integrating contingent hiring into a more holistic approach to talent management is the need for change management. Moving away from a historic way of working with staffing agencies to a direct sourcing strategy requires a different approach across the talent acquisition supply chain. This is where strong leadership and a fully thought out workforce planning strategy is needed.

Data-led decision making

Laurie Padua is managing director of Talent Advisory Services at AMS. She believes that companies need to be more strategic about the talent they attract and employ.

“What we do at advisory is think about the skills and capabilities that an organization needs to drive the end goal it’s trying to achieve, rather than just filling job roles. The worker type is almost irrelevant – it’s about focusing on what your organization needs from a talent perspective, then using data to learn more about the skills and capabilities you are trying to attract,” she says.

“For example, can you get the people you need permanently? Where do they need to be located? Do you need to bring in cohorts of individuals with the skills you need and upskill other employees? We take a holistic, thoughtful approach to talent solutions and contingent hiring is certainly part of that conversation, particularly with the agility and scalability it gives businesses when it comes to costs,” adds Padua.

It’s fine for operational processes and technology to vary between contingent and permanent hiring, says Padua, but your overall strategy must align. Communication is key, otherwise companies can end up in a situation where the contingent hiring team is trying to recruit for the same role as the permanent team.

“The reason some organizations are resistant to change is that they don’t know where to start. Our advisory service can provide expertise on the transformational change journey and get them to the starting point,” says Padua.

Ultimately, change management is a difficult process to go through, but corporations should focus on the benefits of direct sourcing within contingent labor.

“Building contingent recruitment into your holistic talent strategy creates cost savings, allows you to access talent faster and without intermediaries and puts control of talent back into your own hands,” says Padua.

AMS’s own figures back up data around direct sourcing of contingent labor. In the US, AMS clients are achieving in excess of 10% cost savings, with improved candidate quality and quicker submission. Some clients are seeing talent pools in excess of 20,000 contractors after 12-24 months adoption, with other areas of the business using these candidates as part of their emerging skills-based hiring strategy.

“Right now, the traditional routes to market are working. However, our thesis is that things are going to continue to change, the labor market will tighten and that these types of strategies will allow companies to leverage their brand loyalty to make cost savings and generate more hiring options than they currently have,” says Jones.

written by the Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Dustin Talley

Founder & CEO, Talent Simplified

Mark Jones

Executive Vice President, AMS

Laurie Padua

Managing Director, Talent Advisory Services, AMS





Leverage Contingent Process Outsourcing to attract top-tier contingent workers, streamline hiring, and adapt to an evolving workforce.

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Now is time for the rise of Contingent Process Outsourcing

Contributors

Mark Jones
Executive Vice President/Managing Director, Contingent Workforce Services, Americas, AMS

Recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) is an established market globally. Every day, thousands of the world’s best-known organizations trust RPO partners to source and recruit candidates, in the process trusting them with their brand and Employment Value Proposition (EVP).

In the US, RPO providers are closely integrated into organizations, working with talent acquisition to attract the very best people. When it comes to contingent labor however, things are very different.

In the majority of cases across the US, contingent workers have historically been treated more as commodities – a service that is procured via organizations supply chain function and recruited via staffing agencies who have little to no affinity with an organization’s brand.

Talent attraction

Historically, contingent labor has been about ‘can you find me someone, how much will it cost and when can they start?’ It is a very different conversation for full-time employees, who are seen as a segment to invest in and develop. Contingent and full-time hiring are kept as two separate operations, recruited and managed in separate ways.

The challenge is that finding talent in the current climate is difficult, and, in my opinion this is not going to change any time soon.  In addition, organizational demand for contingent labor is also growing as are the expectations of the US workforce to be able to operate via a contingent channel. Companies have grown their contingent worker population by over 50% since pre-pandemic (Brightfield). According to a US Government accountability report, 40% of the US workforce is made up of contingent/freelance workers which will rise to 50% by 2050. The pandemic has only increased the trend that was already being established towards flexibility in working models and approach.

True freelance workers enjoy the ability to work at different times, in different opportunities, often for more than one client at a time. Secondly, if you look through history, you see that contingent workforce hiring goes up in a downturn and vice-versa. As economic conditions tighten, organizations want more flexibility on their workforce base to allow strategic goals to be achieved whilst minimising fixed costs.

This is compounded by the demographics of the US labor market being relatively stagnant. We have restrictions on immigration, an ageing population, a workforce that through illness haven’t been able to return to work post-pandemic, and another segment who don’t want to go back to the way things were. Organizations are fishing in the same pond for talent and coming up short, as we’re not putting any fresh water into the pond.

One way to change the status quo is change the way we fish for talent. Can we use the power of an organization’s brand to better attract contingent workers? Can we do some of the things we do from an RPO perspective to help contingent talent? And, in doing so, can we narrow the train tracks between contingent and full-time labor?

I believe that because there is an increasing demand for non-permanent, flexible working, the US is going to see increased investment in contingent labor and it is going to force the twin tracks of traditional recruitment closer to contingent hiring – with some even merging together in the quest for achieving total talent. The gap between how and why we recruit contingent labor and full-time employees will narrow. However, from an employment and compliance perspective, it’s important to keep some elements of how workers are engaged and managed separate and defined.

As I reflect on the major changes and challenges that have impacted the world we all live in, and look at how the contingent market is changing, the phrase I kept coming back to in articulating this evolution of the market is ‘contingent process outsourcing’ which includes direct sourcing of contract labor.

As I have already said, RPO is already very well-established. Organizations outsource all or part of their recruitment to companies who are entrusted to find talent, manage branding and deal with back-end administration like onboarding and payroll.

Contingent process outsourcing can act in a very similar way. How you attract people and manage them can be the same and the process outsourcing element can be the same. The only difference is that the process is designed for a specific population of workers who have a specific way of being onboarded and employed. They are not ever going to be your full-time employees, but that doesn’t mean you can’t attract them and operate in the same fashion as those who are.  In fact, this is only beneficial for you if you like to try before you buy and regularly convert contingent labor to full-time employees. Virtually every organization has an EVP for their full-time workforce, but very few have a Contingent Value Proposition (CVP) and I see this as a significant missed opportunity when 50% of US workers will operate this way by 2050!

Contingent Process Outsourcing is different from what staffing agencies offer. Staffing agencies play an invaluable role in sourcing workers and there will always be needed for a robust staffing industry. However, the US market is big enough for organizations to introduce the concept of contingent direct sourcing for a certain element of their contingent needs. These workers are attracted to an organizations brand and our managed and treated as such with an eye to long term relationships.

Why choose process outsourcing?

The benefits for employers are clear. Organizations will have people who want to work for them irrespective of how they work for them – contractor, freelancer, full-time etc. All talent will believe in the mission and values of the business, rather than simply being a transitional asset.

Another benefit is cost. On average, our contingent direct sourcing saves companies 10% versus using a traditional staffing agency. However, while cost savings are always nice to have, the biggest driver currently is simply finding the best talent and attracting it to your brand in a very competitive market. With unemployment in the US at a 60-year low, finding the right talent however they are engaged and managed is the biggest reason organizations are turning to contingent direct sourcing.

Why? Firstly, because it drives quality. Contingent direct sourcing creates and nurtures talent that wants to work for an organization and has an affinity for it. Companies have some ownership of that talent pool, with the outsourcer nurturing contingent talent and building a pool of talent that will return to work for the organization again and again.

Of course, this concept of contingent direct sourcing is already established and has become more popular over the last 18-24 months. However, I believe there is a huge opportunity to develop this further especially given the significant and likely permanent shifts in the labor market.

Future of contingent hiring

Adoption of direct sourcing programs has been sporadic and challenging because it means different things to different organizations. A lot of organizations have dipped their toe in the water, but they’re not all leveraging this new way of hiring in the US market to its full extent. That’s a challenge as the only way you create significant savings in contingent labor is through volume.

This will change. Contingent Process Outsourcing leveraging direct sourcing is another way of engaging and attracting talent by harnessing an organization’s brand. With contingent hiring on the rise and flexibility key for both employer and workers – think about the need for skilled technology workers in our talent pools.  We’ll see more organizations looking at how they can better leverage contingent workers as a strategic advantage rather than just as a commodity.

written by the Catalyst Editorial Board

with contribution from:

Mark Jones
Executive Vice President/Managing Director, Contingent Workforce Services, Americas, AMS